Bioeconomy & Biogas

When cultivating maize or rape in close crop rotations for biogas production or biofuel production, a decrease in humus content is to be expected.
Furthermore, the cultivation of energy crops in close crop rotations and energy-intensive mineral fertilisation cannot solve the climate problem. The energy efficiency of agricultural production as a whole must be put to the test!

The use of biogas slurry, which is more readily available to plants than conventional slurry and also with less carbon content, is also welcomed by some publications for (mainly livestock-less) organic farms. However, its increased use should be viewed critically, because although rapid plant availability produces higher harvests, it contradicts the soil fertility-promoting principle of organic farming – soil feeding instead of plant feeding.

*Offer: Bioenergy – sense or nonsense? – Lecture or seminar

*Offer: Biogas – which crop rotations are sustainable? – Lecture or seminar

*Offer: Bioeconomy and land competition – lecture or seminar